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Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania
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October 29, 1942     Mifflinburg Telegraph
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October 29, 1942
 

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):/ Keystone Telegraph Pr~, Inc., Publishers m Entered as Seeond Clas~Matter at the Post Office, Mifflinburg. Pa., under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1789 $2.00 Per Year. Published Every Thursday VOLUME 79 MIFFLINBURG, PENNA., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1942 NO. 23 ,I I Four Pennsylvania flying students at Moodv Field. Georgia. receive ! their final instructions from an officer before takimz off on a training: flight. From left to right: Instructor, Lieutenant James W. Fuller: Aviation Student, John F. P.eish, Route No. 1, Mifflinburg; Aviation Studenl, B. A. i Makowski. 371 First Street, Wilkes-Barre; Aviation Cadet C. O. Ohl. 101 ii East Holland Street. Summit Hill;,A~,iation Student G. A. Levchak. Box No. 87, Starrucca, Pennsylvania Upon the satisfactory completion of their training at Moody Field. Georgia, an Army Air Force Advanced Flying School. these men will re- eeive the coveted "wings" of an Army Dilot. MISS GEORG TO SPEAK PUBLIC INVITED Miss Martica Georg, instructor in the Department of Commerce and Finance at Bucknell University, will speak in the Community Center, Mlfflinburg, Thursday evening, No- vember 5 at 8 o'clock. Miss Georg, who will appear in Mifflinburg un- der the auspices of the joint women's clubs of the west end of the county, will use as the subject of her dis- course, "The World Is Our Busi- ne~;." L. F'. Lybarger, Sr., Mifflinburg attorney, will preside at the meet- ing to which the public is extended an inv it at i9~ ~ - ~iii~end ..... Body Co. Not.Sold Contrary tc the articles published in a number of newspapers last week, the plant of the Mifflinburg Body Company, has not been sold. The trustee has petitioned the court for permission to sell. Hear- ing on the petition will be held No- vember 2nd at Wilkes-Barre. WANTED Covered trucks or delivery wag- ons suitable for use as ambulances are needed by the local Defense Council for use in air raids and practice air raids. The body of the vehicle must he long enough to ac- comodate a 7 foot stretcher. Any- one having a truck to offer, is ask- ed to call Dr. T. G. McQueen or the l~al Defense Council. "Hunt Safely -- Return Sa~ely" PRICES IN COUNTY ~=~= = = = ===== : =_--=========- l~nmtshed by Milton Wagner Eggs ..................................................... 42 Butter .............................................. 88 Mtminburg--- Furnished by Mlmlnbm~ Farmers Exchange for Wedneeday only Wheat ................ (new) ............. 1.18 Oats .................. (new) ................... 45 Rye (new) _ .85 Corn .................... (old) .90 Corn ........ (new - 80 Ibs.) .... 80 Barley .... (new) ........ 65 Buckwheat ............ (ewt.) ........... 1.25 Mlm~n ..... ,No. 1- bu.) .... 1.80 Eggs ................................................... 42 J%we~el--- Furnished by O. L. Burd General Merchandise Eggs ................................................... 42 Yidtsburg-- J. H. Snook Mills i Wheat ................ (new) ................ 1.18 corn .................... (old) ................. 90 ~t~ ........ (new - 80 tbs.) ......... 60 : ~ts .................. (new) .45 Rye ..................................................... 65 Barley ............................................. 65 Bu~kwh~t --.--.__ (ewt.) ______1.28 La~ Furnished by D. R. Pursley Eggs ..................................................... 48 Furnished by A. J. Herbater Wheat ................ (new) .............. 1.18 Outs ..................................................... 45 Corn .................... (old) ................. 90 Corn (new - 80 Ibs.) .... 60 .65 .65 ............ (ewt.) ............ 1.25 Mlllmont-. Furnished by Newton S. Shirk Eggs .44 ll ed by Stewart Shirk .42 Furnished by S. Seebold Eggs .42 Lester L. Speese, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Lester L. Speese of 213 North 3rd Street, Mifflinburg, has ~,tJst completed the first part of his Leatherneck training at one of the great Marine Corps Bases. Private Speese, who is 20, played basket ball and soccer on the local high school teams and was President of the F'.F.A. in his last term. Before enlisting in the Marines he was em- ployed by the Southern New Eng- land Telephone Company. Private Speese is enthusiastic about the Marines and is "proud as a peacock" to be a gyreene. PAUL B. MOYER PROMOTED TO LIEUT. Paul R. Meyer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Meyer, of Hummel's Wharf, former Mifflinburg residents, has attained the rank of second lieu- tenant in the U. S. Army Field Ar- tillery. Inducted into the army April 7, 1942, Lieut. Meyer was sta- tioned at Ft. Bragg, N. C., for basic training. He was one of eleven men selected from a group i)f 250 tc take the Officers' Candidate Training Course. On July 7, he successfully completed the candidate training course and was awarded the rating of Corporal. He was then transf.~rred to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and entered the Gfficers' Training School. On Octo- ber 1, 1942, he secured his commis- sion as second lieutenant. He is now located at~ Camp Roberts, Cali- fornia. Lieut. Meyer is a graduate of the Mifflinburg High School and of Dickinson College, Carlisle. For ten ye ars previous to being inducted in- to the army, he was employed in the Corporation Finance Department of the Chase National Bank, located in lower Manhattan, New York City. ATTENTION -- PUBLIC The burning of leaves on Public streets and alleys is prohibited by State and Borough laws and regula- tions. The burning after sundown is now particularily dangerous be- cause of interference with Black out regulations. Your co-operation is re- quested. Charles M. Snyder, Burgess Hunters have been hunting ducks and woodcock for the pa~t several days. On Saturday of this week hunters will go into the fields and woods to hunt other small game. The Union County Sportsmen's As- sociation for the past several years has worked toward improving con- ditions for game of all varieties. The Association has urged the planting of trees for cover for game birds and animals. From a check up it is found that many evergreen trees and bushes have been started. There are two tracts of public hunting e, rounds where the State Game Com- mission will pldnt natural food for game. The Association is asking the farmers to let a small patch of feed' stand in their fields for winter feed for birds and rabbits. This will help assure the carry over of good strong breeding stock for rais- ing our next years crop of game. In turn the association is asking ~nd requesting its members and all hunters to respect the rights of the farmer. All hunters are asked to keep out and to keep their dogs out of bean fields. On account of the rain the beans will not all be har- vested before the season opens. Came is an asset to any community. It is the desire of the U'nion County Sportsmens Association to have a friendly relation with the farmers and the land owners. Our members er~ utgently asked to cooperate with these people. Our menTbers are re- ouested to report to the game au- thorities any hunter who carelessly breaks down fences or who inten- tionally destroys property of any person who permits hunting on his ground. By friendly cooperation Un- ion County can become the leading g~me County in Pennsylvania. Mr. Hunter please carry with you on your trips a few dozen walnuts or shell-barks or any other seed which will grow into a food tree or bush for game. Heel these seeds under a few inches of soil along some fence row or ditch or on an abandoned strip of ground. In a few-years time we will have a good supply of natural food for our wild life. Each hunter is cautioned to avoid hunting accidents and see that the other fellow does not cause an accidental shooting. The Union County Sports- men's Association wishes all hunters a pleasant and successful hunting season and appreciation to our farm- ers and land owners. Susquehanna University faculty members joined church leaders in New World discussions under the sponsorship of the Susquehanna Conference of the Central Pennsyl- vania Synod of the United Lutheran Church. The panel discussions were on the subject: "The Church's Re- sponsibility for a Better Post-War World" and were held in Trinity Lu- theran church, Selinsgrove, Tuesday afternoon. Dr. G. Morris Smith, president of Susquehanna University, presided over the panel the members of which with their topics are as follows: "The Church's Duty Toward Itself" by Rev. Dr. William M. Rearick, Mifflinburg; "The Church's Respon- sibility for a Better Economic Ord- er" by John Apple, Sunbury; "The Church's Responsibility for an Ade- quate Standard of Living for all Peoples" by Dan Smith, Jr., William- sport; "The Church's Responsibility for a Better International Order" by William R. Russ, Ph.D., Professor of History at Susquehanna University; and "The Church and the New World Concept" by George F. Dunkleberg- er, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Psychology at Susquehanna Univers- ity. Following the talks of the mem- bers of the panel, the meeting was thrown open for questions from the audience. Turn in ... Your Scrap Right NOW/ e- -~- T Mrs. Sydney E. Bateman of Miff- linburg, president of the Union County Federation of Women's Clubs, will preside at the fall meet- ing of the organization to be held this afternoon (Thursday) in the Lu- theran Church of Hartleton. The Hartleton Home and Study Club will b( hostess to the various clubs (.; ~he county. t~ach club mem~ber in attendance is asked to bring one book to be con- lribuled to the Union County Li- brary, a project sponsored by the organization. Speakers of the afternoon will in- c!ude Mrs. C. C. Peters of State Col- lege, vice president of the North Central Disirict, who wilt talk on the subject of "What Your Federa- tion Dues Do" and Miss Cologne, a member of the State College facul- ty, who will use as her subject, "Community Leadership". Miss Col- ogne is substituting for Mrs. Itarry "W. Sehaal of Erie, State Chairman oi Fine Arts, who is unable to be present due to illness in her family. I At 1:45 o'clock members of the (ounty federation will register and at 2 o'clock the session will be form- ally open?d:~ .... ~ ........ ; The Bucknell-Lafayette Home- coming game Saturday will make a direct contribution to the war ef- fort through arrangements now be- ing made between the Bucknell War Savings Staff Committee as repre- sented by Prof. Kenneth Herrold and Prof. R. C. Tasker and the Athletic Council. Foll~ers of 1he Bisons, or the Leopards, for that matter, will have the chance of buy- ing the football that will be used in the game between these two old rivals and, at the same time, make a ctirect contribution to Uncle Sam. An auction will be held during the bali-time period at which time the football will be sold to the highest bidder in War Bonds. Similiar to other auctions held throughout the country, this will be the first time that a football has been .auctioned in Union County Continued on Page Five Rev. William H. Ctipman of Lew- isburg, retired Presbyterian minister, was the speaker at the regular meeting of the Mifflinburg Kiwanis Club held Monday evening in the Hotel. The Rev. Mr. Clipman, a tormer pastor of the Mifflinburg Presbyterian Church, spoke on Col- umbus, discoverer of a new world. The speaker looks upon Columbus as one of the world's great Christ- ians and discoverers. ENTERTAIN AT PARTY' Donald and June Ruhl entertained at a Hallowe'en Party at their home on Millmont, R. D., Friday evening. ii) Staff Sergeant Samuel J. Hacken- berg of the Link Trainer Depart- ment, Page Field, Fort Myers, Flo ..... rids. Staff Scrgcant Hackenberg was transferred in April from Fort : Wayne, Ind., to MacDill Field, Flo- rida, and after spending four weeks there, was sent Io Fort Myers, Flo- rida. LOCAL YOUTH ENROUTE TO IIAWAIIAN ISLANDS Word has been received that Don- ~ld Hackenberg of this place has arrived in San Francisco, Calif. He is enroute to an airfield somewhere in the Hawaiian Islands, where he will be employed as a radio techni- cian. Mr. Hackenberg's position under Civil Service and he received his training at Middletawn: ~ RECEIVE PROMOTIONS Corporals Clayton Hartley and Edwin Harter of Fort Dix, N. J., were promoted to the rank of Ser- geant last Friday. They became Corporals just a week before. Both youths enlisted on DeCember 26 and are still together. Sergeant Hartley is the son, of Mrs. Mable Hartley of Walnut Street, while Sergeant Harter is the son of Mrs. Amelia Harter of York. TWO BOOKS PUBLISHED IN (X)MMEMORATION OF I50TH ANNIVERSARY Two distinctly differen~ books--- the one entitled "Memories of Mifflinburg~' and t h e other "Mifflinburg Celebrates" -- both published by the Mifflinburg Telegraph in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the founding of Mifflinburg are on sale. "Memories of Mifflinburg", which sells or 50c, is a history of Mifflinburg in pictures and stories. "Mifflinburg Celebrates" is a book containing pictures and stor- ies of the entire anniversary cel- ebration, including the parade, and sells for 25c. These books are on sale at the office of the Mifflin- burg Telegraph and at Keens Store. Vote -- It Is a Citizens Duty No matter what your politics, or how yo,u vote, it is your duty as a citizen to go to the polls next Tuesday and vote. Most of the ills in government are traceable to the fact that as citizens we neglect to assert our rights as citi- zens at election time. How can we expect to enjo,y a government "of the people, by the people and for the people" when only bout one half of our voting popul,a ion exercise the privilege of franchise ? Government under these conditions is a government of the minority, and generally holds itself responsible only to the minority th,at has voted it into, power. Vote on Tuesday and make o,ur next State adminisra- tion an administration of the m' jority. -- C. A. KNISS e